When she finally got through

## ## Medicare applications raise anxiety for seniors in pandemic

High School SportsHigh School SoftballHigh School SwimmingHigh School TennisHigh School Track and FieldHigh School Volleyball HS Boys Volleyball HS Girls VolleyballHigh School WrestlingCollege SportsPro SportsSubmit ScoresSubmit Sports News

WASHINGTON (AP) At greater risk from COVID 19, some seniors now face added anxiety due to delays obtaining Medicare coverage.

Advocates for older people say the main problem involves certain applications for Medicare “Part B” coverage for outpatient care. It stems from the closure of local Social Security offices in the coronavirus pandemic.

Part B is particularly important these days because it covers lab tests, like ones for the coronavirus.

Social Security handles eligibility determinations for Medicare, and while many issues can still be resolved online, some require personal attention. That can now entail hold times of 90 minutes or more to reach Social Security on its national 800 number, according to the agency’s website.

Even in normal times, signing up for Part B could be tricky for people who worked past age 65 and kept their workplace coverage. People need to apply separately for the outpatient coverage, and provide Social Security with documentation of their employer policy, to avoid hefty late enrollment penalties.

Fred Riccardi, president of the advocacy group Medicare Rights Center, said an already cumbersome process has been exacerbated by the pandemic shutdown, raising the risk that some seniors will fall into a coverage gap or end up owing penalties.

“We are concerned that people who are eligible will go without coverage due to unnecessary administrative barriers and the lack of information from federal agencies, said Riccardi. problem is serious.”

His organization is among groups asking Congress to hold seniors harmless from Medicare application problems during the coronavirus emergency. It unclear how many are affected.

Social Security declined several interview requests and instead sent The Associated Press written responses to questions. The agency said it has seen an increase in requests for Part B enrollment because of older workers losing job based coverage.

Social Security said it worked with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to waive certain signature requirements for Part B forms during the pandemic and has set up a dedicated fax number to receive applications.

Social Security gets credit for trying, said Leslie Fried of the National Council on Aging, but that “I don’t know anyone who has a fax machine anymore. the economy shedding millions of jobs, older workers going from employer coverage to Medicare can find themselves in a holding pattern.

Carol Berul of Sacramento, California, retired from state government on Feb. 1. She said she still trying to figure out what happened to her Medicare Part B application, which she mailed in January. In her early 70s, Berul said she worried her health could be jeopardized by bogged down paperwork. She has an immune system disorder triggered by a medication that she once took.

“I been avoiding going anywhere,” she said.

Berul said she faced hold times of more than an hour trying to call Social Security. When she finally got through, she learned the agency had no record of her Part B application. She resubmitted it.

Berul said Social Security employees she talked with have been helpful and empathetic but “with all the people working from home trying to get information from point to point, it like a pyramid, and they haven’t connected all the dots.”

For John Breithart of Grand Haven, Michigan, it was a different Medicare issue but a similar experience.

Breithart, who works for an oil and gas delivery company, turns 65 this year and becomes eligible for Medicare Part A inpatient coverage.

He covered through this wife retiree health plan and earlier this month the insurer sent him a letter saying he be kicked off if he didn provide a Medicare number.

Breithart started calling Social Security. He said on one occasion he was on hold for an hour and 52 minutes. Another time a returned call fell through and the case worker didn leave a callback number.

READ ALSO: Mark Renshaw discusses the Tour de France

Mark and Kristina Renshaw assume ownership of popular cycling business

Today PaperIn what many local cyclists would see as a fitting move, a Bathurst cycling store is set to undergo a rebirth under the famous name. Internationally renowned Bathurst cyclist Mark Renshaw and his wife, Kristina, have assumed ownership of Wheeler Cycles Bathurst which, as of next Friday [May 8], will adopt a new name: Renshaw Pedal Project. Since retiring from professional cycling and moving back to his home town, Renshaw said he and Kristina have been keen to give back to the Bathurst cycling community. READ ALSO: Mark Renshaw discusses the Tour de France in an uncertain time for professional cyclists “I looking forward to promoting our local clubs where cycling a key component in the store, including the Bathust Cycling Club, Bathurst Wallabies Triathlon Club and the Bathurst Mountain Bike Club,” he said. “Kristina and I have a lot to learn in the retail business, but we looking forward to working with the existing team in order to create Bathurst hub for all cycling needs.” The new business will retain the existing Wheeler Cycles Bathurst team as well as a prominent new face: Greg Bell, who is closing Belly Bikes after nearly 15 years to join the Renshaws in the new venture. “It was Kristina idea to approach about the new venture and while it is sad to see his business clothing, his experience and clientele will prove invaluable to the new direction,” Renshaw said. “We still have Kirsten Howard, David Hughes and Jayden Falcke on hand, who have built an outstanding relationship with the Bathurst cycling community over the past few years.” READ ALSO: New hair salon Can Do Cuts opens at Kelso Centrepoint shopping centre Bell, who has built a great rapport with the community through his previous business over the years, said the new direction makes perfect sense. “Rather than continue as separate entities, it now makes more sense for us to work together for the betterment the cycling community,” he said. “We all in it for the same reason; for the love of cycling and fitness; and our shared experience will be of further benefit to local cyclists.” In addition to the business, Renshaw is hoping to incorporate some of his old bikes and jerseys as display items. “I collected over 120 jerseys from throughout my career for display, as well as a bike for each team I raced with,” he said. READ ALSO: Fish River Roasters keeping coffee lovers energised during COVID 19 Renshaw said he appreciative of all the support from the Bathurst community over the years, and hopes the new venture will continue to encourage talented cyclists. “The is to get everybody in Bathurst on a bike, whether it be a kids, mountain or high end road variant,” he said. “Cycling is growing in Bathurst, and the COVID 19 situation has had zero impact on sales and maintenance.”April 29 2020 8:00AM

Mark and Kristina Renshaw assume ownership of popular cycling business

Sam Bolt

“I’m looking forward to promoting our local clubs where cycling’s a key component in the store, including the Bathust Cycling Club, Bathurst Wallabies Triathlon Club and the Bathurst Mountain Bike Club,” he said.

“Kristina and I have a lot to learn in the retail business, but we’re looking forward to working with the existing team in order to create Bathurst’s ‘go to’ hub for all cycling needs.”

The new business will retain the existing Wheeler Cycles Bathurst team as well as a prominent new face: Greg ‘Belly’ Bell, who is closing Belly’s Bikes after nearly 15 years to join the Renshaws in the new venture.

“It was Kristina’s idea to approach ‘Belly’ about the new venture and while it is sad to see his business clothing, his experience and clientele will prove invaluable to the new direction,” Renshaw said.

“We’ll still have Kirsten Howard, David Hughes and Jayden Falcke on hand, who have built an outstanding relationship with the Bathurst cycling community over the past few years.”

## ## READ ALSO: New hair salon Can Do Cuts opens at Kelso Centrepoint shopping centre

Bell, who has built a great rapport with the community through his previous business over the years, said the new direction makes perfect sense.

“Rather than continue as separate entities, it now makes more sense for us to work together for the betterment the cycling community,” he said.

“We’re all in it for the same reason; for the love of cycling and fitness; and our shared experience will be of further benefit to local cyclists.”

In addition to the business, Renshaw is hoping to incorporate some of his old bikes and jerseys as display items.

“I’ve collected over 120 jerseys from throughout my career for display, as well as a bike for each team I raced with,” he said.

READ ALSO: Fish River Roasters keeping coffee lovers energised during COVID 19

Renshaw said he’s appreciative of all the support from the Bathurst community over the years, and hopes the new venture will continue to encourage talented cyclists.

Create your website at WordPress.com
Get started